Sexting slut

Added: Shakeela Weise - Date: 17.09.2021 20:13 - Views: 27048 - Clicks: 5886

The girls express how the exchanging of explicit images puts them in a vulnerable position, stating that they are exposed to threats as well as slut- shaming. Sharing explicit sexual images without consent is a form of sexual harassment aimed at the sexting slut, which has an impact on their well-being.

Sexting can be a means of flirting or exploring sexuality, but the activity can also have negative consequences such as humiliation and harassment, especially if images are shared with others without the consent of the person depicted Barrense-Dias et al. Despite this, there is still a lack of studies exploring how teens discuss and experience the phenomenon of sexting and what impact sexting may have on everyday life in school. An important purpose of the study is to explore how the students understand this phenomenon and how this behaviour influences gender relations at school.

This study draws from interviews with students aged 14—15 years attending a lower secondary school in rural Sweden. Research from different countries have shown that it is quite common for young people to be engaged in sexting in one way or another. Sexting has also been found to occur as a result of social pressure, primarily on girls, as an online extension of the sexual harassment that some female students experience at school Van Ouytsel et al. Ringrose et al. Ringrose and colleagues explored how teens discuss the production and circulation of digital images on social media.

Among sexting slut groups of boys, sharing and rating digital images they had received from girls were common practices. The girls, in contrast, described taking and sharing or posting intimate digital images as risky behaviour. They also discussed this in relation to how such behaviour might affect their sexual reputation and the risk of being exposed to slut shaming. Slut shaming is the practice of disparaging girls and women for acting in a manner that violates gendered norms regarding sexually appropriate behaviour.

single Aileen

Similarly, Ricciardelli and Adorjan. This, they argue, reinforces heteronormative understandings of gender and traditional understandings of masculinity and gender. Comparable have also been recognized by Lippman and Campbell One of the most ificant findings in their study was the extent to which girls were judged for their sexting behaviour, whereas the boys were basically immune from any criticism. The study did not reveal any gender differences in terms of sexting slut often girls, compared to boys, were engaged in sending sexts, but the girls to a greater extent reported that they had experienced pressure to do so, especially from boys.

The majority of the negative judgements directed at females came from boys, but in some cases other girls also expressed judgements of girls who had sent sexts. Similar to theseCooper et al.

sluts whore Raina

from Van Ouytsel et al. Walker et al. The show that young people are often involved in sexting practices as a result of the pressures they experience and that social networking sites are used to perpetrate gendered sexual violence targeting women, where the violence takes the more subtle form of sexting slut harassment.

Similar findings were reported by Settysuggesting that risk, shame and blame operate within youth sexting culture to the disadvantage of young females. In contrast to other studies, these findings challenge the notion that harmful sexting practices only arises from the unequal gender dynamics affecting young women. Young men do not necessarily gain status through sexting; they too are at risk of experiencing social shaming and exclusion. This, Setty argues, may cause young men to distance sexting slut from sexting.

A key finding in their study is that the student participants repeatedly stated that they would like parents and teachers to talk to them about sexting practices using a more personal and relational communicative approach. Their also reveal that most of the students were not aware of the legal implications of sexting. To summarize, research indicates that sexting is an increasingly common practice among young people today.

A majority of the studies have also shown the gendered nature of and the sexual double standard driving this phenomenon. The present article seeks to contribute knowledge about these issues and in particular, with regards to the practice of image sharing. Some people exercise greater power than others, a capacity that is influenced by factors such as gender, social class, ethnic background and sexual orientation. In general, power is a relationship that structures social interaction between, for example, men and women, but also among women and among men Messerschmidt, On a structural level, certain masculine norms are given hegemonic status.

According to Connellhegemonic masculinity is a masculine ideal and a norm to which all individuals have to relate. Other masculinities, and also femininities, are measured in relation to, as well as subordinated to, this normalizing and hegemonic masculinity. Central to this study is also the concept of homosociality. Homosociality refers to nonsexual social bonds between persons of the same sex Lipman-Blumen, ; Sedgwick, A common use of the concept is traditionally found in studies of masculinities, male friendship and male bonding that underline the perception that, for men, male fellowship comes first.

The concept of male homosociality is based on a nuanced understanding of the means by which men create close homosocial bonds in order to defend and maintain hierarchical gender relations and power structures. For young males, the peer group is often of central importance for their transition from childhood to manhood. Likewise, male peers are the primary and most important audience for masculine performance Mac an Ghaill, Male homosociality involves a variety of strategies to maintain the conventional gender order Bird, ; Haywood et al. One of them is male bonding expressed through misogynist comments and the sexual objectification of women Bird, ; Kimmel, This study is part of a national research project funded by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare grant — During the initial phase of the study, an ethical review application was submitted to the Regional Ethical Review Board application — The board approved the application during the spring of Due to ethical considerations, all participants in the study received a letter with information about the purpose of the project.

To further ensure trustworthiness, the research team also provided information on the research project at the time of the interviews. The present study was deed as an interview study of 41 students in year 9, aged 14— The interviews sexting slut conducted at Amber School, a lower secondary school in rural Sweden. About students aged 13—16 are enrolled at the school and it is the only lower secondary school in the municipality. Amber School is located in the community of Pinehill, which has approximately 3, inhabitants.

The catchment area of the school covers the entire municipality, which includes Pinehill as well as the surrounding sexting slut villages. The interviews were conducted during February Focus group interviews as well as interviews with pairs and individuals were conducted. A total of seven focus group interviews, two interviews in pairs and 22 individual interviews were conducted.

stunner floozy Kamila

The questions specifically connected to social media included: What kind of messages or images do you receive? How does this affect peer relations at school? If you receive images that you did not agree to receive, do you talk about this with your peers or with adults? How does this make you feel?

During the initial phase, focus group interviews were conducted. The sexting slut group interviews included four to six students in each group. All focus groups were made up of male and female students. During the focus group interviews, different themes emerged, which enabled follow-up questions and the deepening of specific themes during the interviews with pairs sexting slut individuals. These interviews were conducted with a selection of the students from the focus group interviews. The students could choose to be interviewed individually or in pairs, whichever they found most comfortable.

In all, seven focus group interviews, 20 individual interviews and two interviews in pairs were conducted with the two school classes. The focus group interviews lasted up to an hour, the individual interviews were approximately 30 minutes long, and the interviews in pairs lasted for about an hour. All interviews were audio recorded and fully transcribed. All interviews were tly conducted by the authors of this paper. After the interviews were finished, all interviews were collectively transcribed, read, discussed, analysed and thematically coded.

Braun and Clarke have developed six analytical steps or phasesthat they claim are central when using thematic analysis as a methodological tool. These steps were as follows: 1 becoming familiar with the data, that is, reading and discussing the data collectively; 2 initial coding of the data: collectively creating a coding list of all of the participants and names mentioned in the interviews; 3 collectively searching for recurrent patterns in the data, that is, recurrent themes; 4 tly reviewing the main themes and sub-themes; 5 defining and naming the themes and organizing the data according to these themes; and finally, 6 writing, theoretically analysing the data and finalizing the paper.

We conclude this paper by summarizing the main findings and discussing the implications of the study. The exchanging of sexts was expressed in terms of excitement, but also as a form of risk-taking behaviour, as one of the boys, Hans, put it:. Hans: It is quite often that it comes out, you know. You share the picture with each other and then people gossip about it. And everyone knows that it might come out and that would be a bad thing, if sexting slut happened.

Even though both male and female students talked about sending and receiving images, they talked about, and experienced, this in completely different ways. And they are kind of proud of it!

naked personals Chaya

Hans: It is definitely a status thing! Well, it may sound a little exaggerated, but you brag about it. Interviewer: Do you mean, you brag if you manage to receive images from girls? Hans: Yeah. Hans: Yes, it is kind of like that! Hans: Yes, I think sexting slut does Individual interview. Following the quotes above, receiving sexual images from a girl is surrounded by a bragging culture among the boys at Amber School.

For the individual boys it also means that the boy gains status within his peer group. Consequently, male students exchanging images with female peers can be understood as part of, and a strategy for, male bonding and an expression of a vertical homosocial relations among the boys see Bird, ; Haywood et al. Among the girls there was also an awareness that the boys might brag about digital images that they have received from girls, as expressed by Victoria:.

I think that they might brag about sexting slut a lot. Maybe, they feel like they got proof that the girl likes that guy, you know Individual interview. The narrative reveals that some of the boys who exchanged pictures with girls also showed and shared those pictures with their male peers. However, not all boys were engaged in this, according to the students it was only some of the boys who shared sexual digital images with peers. When boys share images and brag about them with their male peers, they are also conforming to, and reinforcing, heterosexuality.

A boy who shares images of girls not only maintains his own heterosexual position, but the message to other boys is that this is the right form of sexuality and the expected way to behave see Kimmel, ; Pascoe, Also, by ignoring, or failing to recognize, how the girl might experience this form of exposure, the existing power relations are maintained.

Interviewer: Why do you send pictures to each other? Is it because you like each other? Students: [Giggle]Interviewer: Do you think it is an embarrassing question? I am trying to understand this phenomenon, you know. Matilda: You either like each other, but sometimes the girl has no choice. Interviewer: Do you mean that you are sometimes pushed to send pictures?

Matilda: Mmm. Interviewer: Okay, are they threatening you? Do they call you things, or what are they doing?

lovely bitch Allyson

Matilda: Yes, and they gossip and spread fake rumours about you Interview in pairs. As expressed in the extract above, boys sometimes use threats to force girls to send more pictures.

black moms Amora

Girls in the study who had personal experience of this behaviour expressed uneasiness and frustration about being put in this sexting slut. Matilda was one of these girls. During an interview in pairs, with her and her friend, Matilda felt more comfortable relating her personal experiences of exchanging pictures on Snapchat. She had exchanged pictures with one of the boys in the class, a boy that she had a crush on. They exchanged semi-nude pictures wearing underwearand this experience had had a great impact on her everyday school life and well-being in school.

Interviewer: I understand that it is quite common for girls to receive non-consensual images from boys? Matilda: Yes it is. There is this guy in my class that I like more than a friend, but the only thing he wanted was pictures of my body. Sure, it was a stupid thing to do, but come on. Tora: I still understand why you sent sexting slut Interview in pairs. By accusing herself for exchanging pictures, Matilda is also blaming herself. The boy who was nagging and pushing her to send those pictures is only described in terms of using her; he is not referred to in terms of being a perpetrator.

During the same interview, her friend Tora expressed her understanding and support about the exchanging of pictures. And I know that there are a lot of people who really feel bad about it! Regardless of gender, the students expressed their awareness of the different gendered expectations placed on girls and boys when sharing digital images. What a slut! The also reveal that some boys threaten to spread rumours of promiscuity about girls, even if these are untrue.

Sexting slut

email: [email protected] - phone:(866) 296-3316 x 1744

They don’t even think about what the girl might think about it’: students’ views on sexting, gender inequalities and power relations in school